Max Bruch

Romanze for violin and orchestra in A Minor, op. 85

            Bruch was a talented and respected composer whose musical style was firmly in the camp of his contemporary, Johannes Brahms.  Not for him the extravagant and progressive orientation of Wagner, Liszt, and their popular followers.  Rather, like Brahms he composed in the more conservative tradition of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, and their admirers.  He was a precocious musician, composing from an early age, and displaying through his long career a remarkable gift for lyricism and the ability to craft a melodic line.  Active in many genres—operas, symphonies, choral music, chamber music, and song—he is most known for his immensely popular first violin concerto, a staple of the repertoire to this day.  He came to rue its popularity, hoping musicians would perform more freque

Violin Concerto No. 1 in G Minor, op. 26

            Bruch was a talented and respected composer whose musical style was firmly in the camp of his contemporary, Johannes Brahms.  Not for him the extravagant and progressive orientation of Wagner, Liszt, and their popular followers.  Rather, like Brahms he composed in the more conservative tradition of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, and their admirers.  He was a precocious musician, composing from an early age, and displaying through his long career a remarkable gift for lyricism and the ability to craft a melodic line.  Active in many genres—operas, symphonies, choral music, chamber music, and song—he is best known for his immensely popular first violin concerto.  He wrote two others, as well, but they did not achieve any lasting success.